Return to a healthy, active lifestyle through Cartilage Restoration

Elbow

Conditions

Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is the common name for the elbow condition lateral epicondylitis. It is an overuse injury that causes inflammation of the tendons that attach to the bony prominence on the outside of the elbow. It is a painful condition occurring from repeated muscle contractions in the forearm that leads to inflammation and micro tears in the tendons that attach to the lateral epicondyle. The lateral epicondyle is the bony prominence that is felt on the outside of the elbow and the condition is more common in sports individuals playing tennis.

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Elbow Arthroscopy

Elbow is the joint that connects the upper arm bone and the forearm bones. Elbow joint helps in moving of the arms forward, backward, as well as to twist the arms inside and outside.

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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital tunnel release surgery is a surgery to correct the cubital tunnel syndrome. Cubital tunnel syndrome, also called ulnar nerve entrapment, is a condition caused by the compression of ulnar nerve in the elbow. The ulnar nerve travels down back to the elbow behind the bony bump called the medial epicondyle and through a passageway called the cubital tunnel.

Find out more about Cubital Tunnel Syndrome from the following links.

Tendonitis

Tendonitis refers to the inflammation of a tendon, which is a band of fibrous connective tissue that attaches a muscle to a bone. Tendonitis can result from repetitive or overuse injuries and can occur during activities such as gardening, carpentry, shoveling, painting, scrubbing, tennis, golfing, skiing, and pitching. People with poor posture or those who avoid stretching before exercise are at a higher risk of developing tendonitis. Tendonitis can also affect individuals with rheumatoid arthritis, gout, psoriatic arthritis, thyroid disorders, infections or an unusual medication reaction.

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Cartilage Restoration

Click on the topics below to find out more from the orthopedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.